Gemma Casadesus

Gemma Casadesus

Professor

Department: MD-PHARMACOLOGY / THERAPEUTICS
Business Phone: (352) 294-5804
Business Email: gcasadesus@ufl.edu

About Gemma Casadesus

The main goal of Dr. Casadesus’ Research program is to understand how, at a cellular and molecular level, age-related or lifestyle-mediated changes in hormones receptor signaling impact brain health and drive increased risk for AD. Current interests focus on understanding the mechanistic impact of age-related reproductive hormone dysregulation in females and lifestyle-related metabolic dysregulation (obesity/T2D) on endpoints including but not limited to neuronal plasticity, cellular metabolism and stress, and learning & memory function and signaling. Another current interest in the laboratory is to identify underlying genomic signatures that confer sexually dimorphic protection or increased risk for AD. The ultimate objective of the laboratory is to develop therapeutic interventions that will foster healthy brain aging and slow or forestall AD development.

Dr. Gemma Casadesus earned her Ph.D. in 2003 from Tufts University for her work investigating the impact of polyphenolic-rich diets on aging brain neurochemistry, plasticity, and cognition. After her postdoctoral training in the Pathology department at Case Western Reserve University, studying oxidative stress and hormone dysregulation mechanisms on AD pathogenesis, Dr. Casadesus was recruited to the Department of Neurosciences at the same institution, where she remained as tenure track faculty and founding director of the CWRU rodent behavior core until 2013. In 2014, she joined Kent State University’s Biological Sciences department as Associate and Full professor until joining the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in 2020.

Research Profile

The central hypothesis that drives the work in the Casadesus laboratory is that age-related dysregulation of fundamental physiological processes precedes and/or underlies the development of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Based on this hypothesis the primary aim is to identify the mechanistic basis underlying age-related/lifestyle conditions that confer increased AD risk (or protection) to develop novel and better targeted disease-delaying therapeutic strategies.

A current major interest in the laboratory is to understand how dysregulation of specific hormones due to aging or lifestyle choices, impact neuronal structure and plasticity, cellular metabolism, and cognition. The Casadesus laboratory is also interested in identifying the genomic signatures that may explain sex-specific vulnerability or protection to these hormone changes. Particular focus is placed on understanding the roles of under-studied reproductive and metabolic hormones, their receptors, and neuroendocrine circuits. These include but are not limited to luteinizing hormone and amylin in the context of menopause and obesity/T2D.

To address such questions, our laboratory employs a broad range of in vivo and in vitro techniques, spanning from behavioral phenotyping assays, standard biochemical measures, and confocal imaging, to systems neuroscience approaches (transcriptomics) and cutting-edge gene editing techniques using CRISPR/Cas9 and virus delivery approaches.

Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID)

0000-0002-5206-5637

Areas of Interest
  • Aging
  • Integrative neuroscience
  • Menopause
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Neurodegenerative diseases
  • Neuromodulation
  • Neuropathology of Neurodegenerative diseases
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Sex Differences
  • neuroendocrinology
  • neurometabolism

Publications

2020
Automated Isoform Diversity Detector (AIDD): a pipeline for investigating transcriptome diversity of RNA-seq data.
BMC bioinformatics. 21(Suppl 18) [DOI] 10.1186/s12859-020-03888-6. [PMID] 33375933.
2020
The Importance of Understanding Amylin Signaling Mechanisms for Therapeutic Development in the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Current pharmaceutical design. 26(12):1345-1355 [DOI] 10.2174/1381612826666200318151146. [PMID] 32188374.
2020
Brain energy rescue: an emerging therapeutic concept for neurodegenerative disorders of ageing.
Nature reviews. Drug discovery. 19(9):609-633 [DOI] 10.1038/s41573-020-0072-x. [PMID] 32709961.
2020
Correction to: Peripheral and Central Effects of Memantine in a Mixed Preclinical Mice Model of Obesity and Familial Alzheimer’s Disease.
Molecular neurobiology. 57(6):2887-2888 [DOI] 10.1007/s12035-020-01918-1. [PMID] 32367492.
2019
Amylin Signaling in Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease: Therapy or Pathology?
Journal of neurology & neuromedicine. 4(1):12-16 [DOI] 10.29245/2572.942X/2019/1.1212. [PMID] 31511851.
2019
CNS luteinizing hormone receptor activation rescues ovariectomy-related loss of spatial memory and neuronal plasticity.
Neurobiology of aging. 78:111-120 [DOI] 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.02.002. [PMID] 30925299.
2019
Neuroprotective Effects of the Amylin Analog, Pramlintide, on Alzheimer’s Disease Are Associated with Oxidative Stress Regulation Mechanisms.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 69(1):157-168 [DOI] 10.3233/JAD-180421. [PMID] 30958347.
2018
Experimental Models for Aging and their Potential for Novel Drug Discovery.
Current neuropharmacology. 16(10):1466-1483 [DOI] 10.2174/1570159X15666170707155345. [PMID] 28685671.
2018
Luteinizing Hormone Involvement in Aging Female Cognition: Not All Is Estrogen Loss.
Frontiers in endocrinology. 9 [DOI] 10.3389/fendo.2018.00544. [PMID] 30319538.
2018
Neuroprotective Effects of Amylin Analogues on Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis and Cognition.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 66(1):11-23 [DOI] 10.3233/JAD-180433. [PMID] 30282360.
2018
Peripheral and Central Effects of Memantine in a Mixed Preclinical Mice Model of Obesity and Familial Alzheimer’s Disease.
Molecular neurobiology. 55(9):7327-7339 [DOI] 10.1007/s12035-018-0868-4. [PMID] 29404958.
2016
Correction: Individual Case Analysis of Postmortem Interval Time on Brain Tissue Preservation.
PloS one. 11(6) [DOI] 10.1371/journal.pone.0157209. [PMID] 27258001.
2016
Individual Case Analysis of Postmortem Interval Time on Brain Tissue Preservation.
PloS one. 11(3) [DOI] 10.1371/journal.pone.0151615. [PMID] 26982086.
2016
Luteinizing hormone downregulation but not estrogen replacement improves ovariectomy-associated cognition and spine density loss independently of treatment onset timing.
Hormones and behavior. 78:60-6 [DOI] 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.10.013. [PMID] 26497249.
2016
The therapeutic potential of metabolic hormones in the treatment of age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.
Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.). 36(12):1305-1315 [DOI] 10.1016/j.nutres.2016.11.002. [PMID] 27923524.
2015
Luteinizing hormone: Evidence for direct action in the CNS.
Hormones and behavior. 76:57-62 [DOI] 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.06.020. [PMID] 26172857.
2015
From Neurodegeneration to Brain Health: An Integrated Approach.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 46(1):271-83 [DOI] 10.3233/JAD-150043. [PMID] 25720413.
2015
Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis involvement in learning and memory and Alzheimer’s disease: more than “just” estrogen.
Frontiers in endocrinology. 6 [DOI] 10.3389/fendo.2015.00045. [PMID] 25859241.
2014
Accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-β is common in normal brain.
Current Alzheimer research. 11(4):317-24 [PMID] 24597504.
View on: PubMed
2014
Down-regulation of serum gonadotropins but not estrogen replacement improves cognition in aged-ovariectomized 3xTg AD female mice.
Journal of neurochemistry. 130(1):115-25 [DOI] 10.1111/jnc.12706. [PMID] 24601954.
2014
Dysregulation of leptin signaling in Alzheimer disease: evidence for neuronal leptin resistance.
Journal of neurochemistry. 128(1):162-72 [DOI] 10.1111/jnc.12380. [PMID] 23895348.
2014
Fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) regulates cognitive function both by decreasing anandamide levels and by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) in the brain.
The Journal of biological chemistry. 289(18):12748-58 [DOI] 10.1074/jbc.M114.559062. [PMID] 24644281.
2014
Neuroprotective effects of the amylin analogue pramlintide on Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis and cognition.
Neurobiology of aging. 35(4):793-801 [DOI] 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.10.076. [PMID] 24239383.
2013
Mitochondrial abnormalities in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease.
Current Alzheimer research. 10(4):406-19 [PMID] 23061885.
View on: PubMed
2013
Respiratory and behavioral dysfunction following loss of the GABAA receptor α4 subunit.
Brain and behavior. 3(2):104-13 [DOI] 10.1002/brb3.122. [PMID] 23533098.
2012
Neuroendocrinology-based therapy for Alzheimer’s disease.
BioFactors (Oxford, England). 38(2):123-32 [DOI] 10.1002/biof.1011. [PMID] 22438197.
2012
Low-dose pterostilbene, but not resveratrol, is a potent neuromodulator in aging and Alzheimer’s disease.
Neurobiology of aging. 33(9):2062-71 [DOI] 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.08.015. [PMID] 21982274.
2012
Retinoids for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
BioFactors (Oxford, England). 38(2):84-9 [DOI] 10.1002/biof.196. [PMID] 22419567.
2012
LRRK2 regulates mitochondrial dynamics and function through direct interaction with DLP1.
Human molecular genetics. 21(9):1931-44 [DOI] 10.1093/hmg/dds003. [PMID] 22228096.
2012
Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease.
Journal of neurochemistry. 120(3):419-29 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2011.07581.x. [PMID] 22077634.
2012
Activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway contributes to the behavioral deficit of fragile x-syndrome.
Journal of neurochemistry. 121(4):672-9 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2012.07722.x. [PMID] 22393900.
2012
Klf15 orchestrates circadian nitrogen homeostasis.
Cell metabolism. 15(3):311-23 [DOI] 10.1016/j.cmet.2012.01.020. [PMID] 22405069.
2011
Frontiers in Alzheimer’s disease therapeutics.
Therapeutic advances in chronic disease. 2(1):9-23 [DOI] 10.1177/2040622310382817. [PMID] 21743833.
2011
The sirtuin pathway in ageing and Alzheimer disease: mechanistic and therapeutic considerations.
The Lancet. Neurology. 10(3):275-9 [DOI] 10.1016/S1474-4422(11)70013-8. [PMID] 21349442.
2011
Transection of CA3 does not affect memory performance in rats.
Epilepsy & behavior : E&B. 21(3):267-70 [DOI] 10.1016/j.yebeh.2011.04.006. [PMID] 21576037.
2010
Special issue on estrogen actions in the brain.
Biochimica et biophysica acta. 1800(10) [DOI] 10.1016/j.bbagen.2010.08.002. [PMID] 20800763.
2010
Review: cell cycle aberrations and neurodegeneration.
Neuropathology and applied neurobiology. 36(2):157-63 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1365-2990.2010.01064.x. [PMID] 20059701.
2010
Pet-1 is required across different stages of life to regulate serotonergic function.
Nature neuroscience. 13(10):1190-8 [DOI] 10.1038/nn.2623. [PMID] 20818386.
2010
Mitochondrial biology in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis.
Journal of neurochemistry. 114(4):933-45 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2010.06814.x. [PMID] 20492350.
2010
Memantine: “hypothesis testing” not “disease modifying” in Alzheimer’s disease.
The American journal of pathology. 176(2):540-1 [DOI] 10.2353/ajpath.2010.090856. [PMID] 20019185.
2010
Oxidative Stress and its Implications for Future Treatments and Management of Alzheimer Disease.
International journal of biomedical science : IJBS. 6(3):225-227 [PMID] 21765811.
View on: PubMed
2010
Estrogen-mediated effects on cognition and synaptic plasticity: what do estrogen receptor knockout models tell us?
Biochimica et biophysica acta. 1800(10):1090-3 [DOI] 10.1016/j.bbagen.2010.05.001. [PMID] 20470868.
2010
Down-regulation of serum gonadotropins is as effective as estrogen replacement at improving menopause-associated cognitive deficits.
Journal of neurochemistry. 112(4):870-81 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.06502.x. [PMID] 19943850.
2010
Autophagy in Alzheimer’s disease.
Expert review of neurotherapeutics. 10(7):1209-18 [DOI] 10.1586/ern.10.84. [PMID] 20586699.
2010
Antioxidant approaches for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
Expert review of neurotherapeutics. 10(7):1201-8 [DOI] 10.1586/ern.10.74. [PMID] 20586698.
2010
Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease.
International journal of Alzheimer's disease. 2010 [DOI] 10.4061/2010/606357. [PMID] 21804934.
2010
Leptin reduces pathology and improves memory in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 19(4):1155-67 [DOI] 10.3233/JAD-2010-1308. [PMID] 20308782.
2009
Leptin: a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 16(4):731-40 [DOI] 10.3233/JAD-2009-1021. [PMID] 19387109.
2009
Leptin inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3beta to prevent tau phosphorylation in neuronal cells.
Neuroscience letters. 455(3):191-4 [DOI] 10.1016/j.neulet.2009.03.066. [PMID] 19429119.
2009
Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets.
Pharmaceuticals (Basel, Switzerland). 2(3):250-286 [PMID] 27713238.
View on: PubMed
2009
Evaluation of 9-cis-retinyl acetate therapy in Rpe65-/- mice.
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science. 50(9):4368-78 [DOI] 10.1167/iovs.09-3700. [PMID] 19407008.
2009
Chronic Leptin Supplementation Ameliorates Pathology and Improves Cognitive Performance in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. [PMID] 20009219.
View on: PubMed
2009
Cell cycle re-entry mediated neurodegeneration and its treatment role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease.
Neurochemistry international. 54(2):84-8 [DOI] 10.1016/j.neuint.2008.10.013. [PMID] 19114068.
2009
Cell cycle aberrations in Alzheimer’s disease: a novel therapeutic opportunity.
Expert review of neurotherapeutics. 9(11):1579-80 [DOI] 10.1586/ern.09.113. [PMID] 19903017.
2009
All-trans retinoic acid as a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease.
Expert review of neurotherapeutics. 9(11):1615-21 [DOI] 10.1586/ern.09.86. [PMID] 19903021.
2009
A novel approach to the identification and quantitative elemental analysis of amyloid deposits–insights into the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.
Biochemical and biophysical research communications. 382(1):91-5 [DOI] 10.1016/j.bbrc.2009.02.136. [PMID] 19258010.
2009
Chronic antioxidant therapy reduces oxidative stress in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease.
Free radical research. 43(2):156-64 [DOI] 10.1080/10715760802644694. [PMID] 19160110.
2009
The effect of mGluR2 activation on signal transduction pathways and neuronal cell survival.
Brain research. 1249:244-50 [DOI] 10.1016/j.brainres.2008.10.055. [PMID] 19026996.
2009
The neuronal expression of MYC causes a neurodegenerative phenotype in a novel transgenic mouse.
The American journal of pathology. 174(3):891-7 [DOI] 10.2353/ajpath.2009.080583. [PMID] 19164506.
2009
Treatment advances in Alzheimer’s disease based on the oxidative stress model.
F1000 medicine reports. 1 [DOI] 10.3410/M1-54. [PMID] 20948726.
2009
Walking toward a convergence in aging research.
Frontiers in neuroscience. 3(1) [DOI] 10.3389/neuro.01.012.2009. [PMID] 19753087.
2009
The X-chromosome instability phenotype in Alzheimer’s disease: a clinical sign of accelerating aging?
Medical hypotheses. 73(6):917-20 [DOI] 10.1016/j.mehy.2009.06.046. [PMID] 19647374.
2008
Amyloid-beta overproduction causes abnormal mitochondrial dynamics via differential modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 105(49):19318-23 [DOI] 10.1073/pnas.0804871105. [PMID] 19050078.
2008
Clinical benefit and preservation of flavonols in dark chocolate manufacturing.
Nutrition reviews. 66(11):630-41 [DOI] 10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00114.x. [PMID] 19019025.
2008
Expression of CD74 is increased in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer’s disease.
Molecular neurodegeneration. 3 [DOI] 10.1186/1750-1326-3-13. [PMID] 18786268.
2008
From aging to Alzheimer’s disease: unveiling “the switch” with the senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8).
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 15(4):615-24 [PMID] 19096160.
View on: PubMed
2008
Leptin reduces Alzheimer’s disease-related tau phosphorylation in neuronal cells.
Biochemical and biophysical research communications. 376(3):536-41 [DOI] 10.1016/j.bbrc.2008.09.026. [PMID] 18801339.
2008
Lithium treatment decreases activities of tau kinases in a murine model of senescence.
Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology. 67(6):612-23 [DOI] 10.1097/NEN.0b013e3181776293. [PMID] 18520779.
2008
Menopause, estrogen, and gonadotropins in Alzheimer’s disease.
Advances in clinical chemistry. 45:139-53 [PMID] 18429496.
View on: PubMed
2008
Retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation at multiple sites is associated with neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer disease.
International journal of clinical and experimental pathology. 1(2):134-46 [PMID] 18784806.
View on: PubMed
2007
Vascular oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.
Journal of the neurological sciences. 257(1-2):240-6 [PMID] 17337008.
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2007
The contribution of luteinizing hormone to Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.
Clinical medicine & research. 5(3):177-83 [PMID] 18056027.
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2007
Signal transduction cascades associated with oxidative stress in Alzheimer’s disease.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 11(2):143-52 [PMID] 17522439.
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2007
Overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) in skeletal muscle repatterns energy metabolism in the mouse.
The Journal of biological chemistry. 282(45):32844-55 [PMID] 17716967.
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2007
Indices of metabolic dysfunction and oxidative stress.
Neurochemical research. 32(4-5):717-22 [PMID] 17342408.
View on: PubMed
2007
Neuronal cell cycle re-entry mediates Alzheimer disease-type changes.
Biochimica et biophysica acta. 1772(4):467-72 [PMID] 17095196.
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2007
Increases in luteinizing hormone are associated with declines in cognitive performance.
Molecular and cellular endocrinology. 269(1-2):107-11 [PMID] 17376589.
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2007
Increased permeability of blood-brain barrier on the hippocampus of a murine model of senescence.
Mechanisms of ageing and development. 128(9):522-8 [PMID] 17697702.
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2007
Increased isoprostane and prostaglandin are prominent in neurons in Alzheimer disease.
Molecular neurodegeneration. 2 [PMID] 17241462.
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2007
Gonadotropins: a cohesive gender-based etiology of Alzheimer disease.
Molecular and cellular endocrinology. 260-262:271-5 [PMID] 17052835.
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2007
Evidence for the role of luteinizing hormone in Alzheimer disease.
Endocrine, metabolic & immune disorders drug targets. 7(4):300-3 [PMID] 18220951.
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2006
The estrogen myth: potential use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
Drugs in R&D. 7(3):187-93 [PMID] 16752944.
View on: PubMed
2006
The cell cycle and hormonal fluxes in Alzheimer disease: a novel therapeutic target.
Current pharmaceutical design. 12(6):691-7 [PMID] 16472159.
View on: PubMed
2006
Synaptic dysfunction and oxidative stress in Alzheimer’s disease: emerging mechanisms.
Journal of cellular and molecular medicine. 10(3):796-805 [PMID] 16989739.
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2006
Targeting gonadotropins: an alternative option for Alzheimer disease treatment.
Journal of biomedicine & biotechnology. 2006(3) [PMID] 17047306.
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2006
Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR): evidence of gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis in Alzheimer disease.
Molecular neurodegeneration. 1 [PMID] 17018137.
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2006
Luteinizing hormone modulates cognition and amyloid-beta deposition in Alzheimer APP transgenic mice.
Biochimica et biophysica acta. 1762(4):447-52 [PMID] 16503402.
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2006
Brain and brawn: parallels in oxidative strength.
Neurology. 66(2 Suppl 1):S97-101 [PMID] 16432155.
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2005
Therapeutic opportunities in Alzheimer disease: one for all or all for one?
Current medicinal chemistry. 12(10):1137-47 [PMID] 15892629.
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2005
The cell cycle in Alzheimer disease: a unique target for neuropharmacology.
Mechanisms of ageing and development. 126(10):1019-25 [PMID] 15936057.
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2005
Reversing the deleterious effects of aging on neuronal communication and behavior: beneficial properties of fruit polyphenolic compounds.
The American journal of clinical nutrition. 81(1 Suppl):313S-316S [DOI] 10.1093/ajcn/81.1.313S. [PMID] 15640496.
2005
Oxidative stress and inflammation in brain aging: nutritional considerations.
Neurochemical research. 30(6-7):927-35 [PMID] 16187227.
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2005
Oxidative imbalance in Alzheimer’s disease.
Molecular neurobiology. 31(1-3):205-17 [PMID] 15953822.
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2005
Commentary: “Ceramide and cholesterol: possible connections between normal aging of the brain and Alzheimer’s disease. Just hypotheses or molecular pathways to be identified?” by Claudio Costantini, Rekha M.K. Kolasani, and Luigi Puglielli.
Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association. 1(1):51-2 [DOI] 10.1016/j.jalz.2005.06.011. [PMID] 19595817.
2005
Gender differences in Alzheimer disease: the role of luteinizing hormone in disease pathogenesis.
Alzheimer disease and associated disorders. 19(2):95-9 [PMID] 15942328.
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2005
Evidence for the role of gonadotropin hormones in the development of Alzheimer disease.
Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS. 62(3):293-8 [PMID] 15723165.
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2005
Estrogen bows to a new master: the role of gonadotropins in Alzheimer pathogenesis.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1052:201-9 [PMID] 16024763.
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2005
Hippocampal neurogenesis and PSA-NCAM expression following exposure to 56Fe particles mimics that seen during aging in rats.
Experimental gerontology. 40(3):249-54 [PMID] 15763403.
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2004
The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in Alzheimer’s disease.
Acta neurobiologiae experimentalis. 64(1):89-98 [PMID] 15190683.
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2004
The effects of heavy particle irradiation on exploration and response to environmental change.
Advances in space research : the official journal of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). 33(8):1340-6 [PMID] 15803625.
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2004
Perspectives on the amyloid-beta cascade hypothesis.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 6(2):137-45 [PMID] 15096697.
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2004
Oxidative stress and redox-active iron in Alzheimer’s disease.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1012:179-82 [PMID] 15105265.
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2004
Modulation of hippocampal plasticity and cognitive behavior by short-term blueberry supplementation in aged rats.
Nutritional neuroscience. 7(5-6):309-16 [PMID] 15682927.
View on: PubMed
2004
Oxidative stress signalling in Alzheimer’s disease.
Brain research. 1000(1-2):32-9 [PMID] 15053949.
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2004
Gonadotropins and Alzheimer’s disease: the link between estrogen replacement therapy and neuroprotection.
Acta neurobiologiae experimentalis. 64(1):113-8 [PMID] 15190686.
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2004
Challenging the amyloid cascade hypothesis: senile plaques and amyloid-beta as protective adaptations to Alzheimer disease.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1019:1-4 [PMID] 15246983.
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2004
Beyond estrogen: targeting gonadotropin hormones in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
Current drug targets. CNS and neurological disorders. 3(4):281-5 [PMID] 15379604.
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2004
Alzheimer disease: evidence for a central pathogenic role of iron-mediated reactive oxygen species.
Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD. 6(2):165-9 [PMID] 15096700.
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2004
Mitotic and gender parallels in Alzheimer disease: therapeutic opportunities.
Current drug targets. 5(6):559-63 [PMID] 15270202.
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2003
A metabolic basis for Alzheimer disease.
Neurochemical research. 28(10):1549-52 [PMID] 14570400.
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2003
Cognitive deficits induced by 56Fe radiation exposure.
Advances in space research : the official journal of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). 31(1):119-26 [PMID] 12577981.
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2002
Amyloid-beta and tau serve antioxidant functions in the aging and Alzheimer brain.
Free radical biology & medicine. 33(9):1194-9 [PMID] 12398927.
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2002
Qualitative versus quantitative caloric intake: are they equivalent paths to successful aging?
Neurobiology of aging. 23(5):747-69 [PMID] 12392779.
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2001
Automated measurement of age-related changes in the locomotor response to environmental novelty and home-cage activity.
Mechanisms of ageing and development. 122(15):1887-97 [PMID] 11557287.
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2001
Effect of age on object exploration, habituation, and response to spatial and nonspatial change.
Behavioral neuroscience. 115(5):1059-64 [PMID] 11584918.
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2000
Spatial learning and memory deficits induced by exposure to iron-56-particle radiation.
Radiation research. 154(1):28-33 [PMID] 10856962.
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Contact Details

Phones:
Business:
(352) 294-5804
Emails:
Business:
gcasadesus@ufl.edu